Custard Cream Fudge

Vanilla clotted cream fudge filled with chunks of custard creams. You’ll be reaching for piece after piece of this scrummy fudge!

Originally posted in May 2014, recipe and photographs updated August 2019. 

As mentioned above, today on the blog I have a recipe update to share. It’s seriously delicious, requires five ingredients and will be gone in a flash!

I previously shared this recipe five years ago and as I was making this fudge again last weekend and I thought I’d update the recipe and photos from the original blog post.

Several months ago I made this Bourbon Biscuit Fudge and that reminded me of this recipe I created when I’d just started food blogging – it’s such a long time ago now! I always find it nice to go back, update and remake older recipes because often as a food blogger you’re having so much fun creating new content that you tend to overlook older, much-loved bakes that are deserving of a makeover.

My custard cream fudge has proved popular with readers making and enjoying it, also on one occasion my auntie took some of this along to a charity bake sale and it sold out almost immediately!

Not to sound bigheaded, but I think that tells you how good this fudge recipe is!

My sister, Becky, modelling this yummy custard cream fudge. The best sweetshop vanilla fudge with chunks of crunchy biscuits throughout!

I use a brilliant clotted cream fudge recipe from Rodda’s and add chopped custard creams. For anyone overseas or who might not know what custard creams are, they’re basically two plain biscuits sandwiched together with a vanilla custard-flavoured buttercream filling.

Trust me, once you’ve tasted a custard cream there’s no doubt about it you’ll be hooked on them! Along with bourbon cream biscuits, digestives, gingernuts and jammy dodgers, custard creams too are one of us Britons favourite biscuits for dunking into tea.

The crunch from the vanilla flavoured biscuits contrasts wonderfully with the rich decadent clotted cream fudge. The reason I love this fudge recipe is because it tastes almost exactly like handmade fudge from a traditional sweetshop, but better because it’ll be made in your own kitchen!

For a change try a piece of this Custard Cream Fudge with your next cup of coffee or tea!

(Makes approx. 40 pieces)

Ingredients:

275g caster sugar

1 x 227g tub Cornish clotted cream

100g golden syrup

1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional)

200g custard creams, chopped

Method:

  1. Line a 8 x 8 inch (20 x 20cm) square tin with parchment paper and set aside.
    Place all the ingredients (except the custard creams) in a large saucepan. Heat gently and stir until all the sugar has dissolved.
  2. Turn the heat up and the bring the mixture up to the boil – occasionally stir the fudge to stop it catching. Allow to boil for 3-5 minutes until it’s turned a light golden colour. Then take straight off the heat – you can check the fudge is ready by using a sugar thermometer. If it has reached 116°C / 240°F then it’s ready. But if you don’t have a thermometer you can drop a small amount of the mixture into a glass of cold water and if a soft ball forms, then the fudge is ready to take off the heat.
  3. Using a wooden spoon, continuously beat the fudge for 5-10 minutes until it is really thick and matte. Now fold in 3/4 of the chopped biscuits. Spread the fudge into the tin you prepared and lined earlier and decorate the top with the remaining chopped biscuits – press into the top to make sure they stick.
  4. Place the fudge in the fridge for at least 4 hours or overnight until set. Once set, cut the fudge into pieces – this recipe makes approx. 40 pieces of fudge.
  5. Fudge will keep in an airtight container at room temperature or in the fridge for up to 3 days.

Recipe Notes:

  • Though the recipe only requires five ingredients, the vanilla extract is optional. I love the flavour it adds, but it can be omitted.
  • This recipe makes roughly 40 pieces of fudge, it might make more or less depending on how big or small you cut your squares of fudge.
  • The fudge is best left overnight to set for it to firm up enough.
  • This fudge will keep stored in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days, please note that the biscuit on top will soften and loses it crunchiness a little the longer you keep it – however the biscuit takes on a softer more cake-like consistency, which is still very enjoyable nonetheless.

For a chocolate version of this fudge try my Bourbon Biscuit Fudge next!

Enjoy!

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58 thoughts on “Custard Cream Fudge

  1. I love custard creams Jessica, I could eat a ton of them and I could eat a ton of this fudge, it looks delicious! I also noticed you put clotted cream in the fudge…yum! I can imagine some clotted cream stuffed inside a custard cream would be so good!

  2. Jess, these do look moorish! I bet it is fantastic with the crunchy from the biscuits and the smooth creaminess from the fudge. Have a super weekend. Take Care, BAM

  3. This must be one of the most scrumptious bites of heaven I can recall. The problem here in Spain (at least in the region where I’m from) is that it’s almost impossible to find clotted cream or these custard creams… So, next time in the UK i’m determined to have as many as I can 😉
    Un beso, preciosa!

  4. Jessica they look good we got this biscuits in Aussie land but never seen clotted cream what can we use instead. HELP anyone has an idea many thanks.🌻

  5. This recipe is just so BRITISH! and to me that is exotic and I love it 😉 Custard cream biscuits, golden syrup, and clotted cream are all specialty ingredients here in the US, and that makes this all the more alluring… Pinning!

  6. Ooh, custard creams in fudge? That’s a genius idea… bet the vanilla-y-ness and crunch go together so well with the fudge itself. Would be dangerous around here… I’d end up eating it way too fast!

  7. I have to admit I’m not the biggest fudge person unless it’s really special, and I can tell this one is! I love the sound of those custard cream biscuits, and they look so delicious throughout this fudge. Wonderful idea. Pinning!

  8. This fudge looks delicious! I love the sound of the custard cream biscuits in here – this is such a great idea Jessica 🙂

  9. I’ve never had a custard cream before – it sounds like I need to find them here in the US! I’d probably eat the whole batch before attempting this fudge though. 😉

  10. My local grocery store has an “international” aisle with a British section, and I’ve definitely seen those cookies there! My boyfriend for some reason always throws a fit in that aisle, wanting British cookies, so I’m pretty familiar with it. I normally let him get some kind of tea biscuit because they’re cheap and not too many calories, but I think next time I’ll have to let him try these! They sound like incredible cookies + that fudge sounds epic.

  11. Pingback: Fudge - Homemade Present

  12. Hey Jess, Just a quick note to let you know I made your fudge last week (with Oreos, yum!) and published a post about it tonight (http://lecoindemel.com/fudge/). I linked to your recipe as it is so easy and yummy. Thanks again for sharing! x Mel

  13. Clotted cream???? Never used it but I will now! Luckily I have a British market/grocery store 2 blocks from my office where they sell clotted cream. Mmmm!

  14. Did you say these are so easy to make? Wow! These really are the BESTEST – easy to make, yet so scrumptious! This is really a wonderful thing to make if you have little time after a long day and you want to make something enjoyable for the weekends. These are also good for gifts and great for munching while watching a good movie. 😀

    Thank you for bringing these! I am sure party goers will enjoy these! Have a fab weekend! ❤

  15. ooh I love custard creams and I love fudge, the two together sounds amazing! I haven’t made fudge for a long time, I may have to do it again – starting with custard creams!

  16. Pingback: Guest Post: What Jessica Baked Next | blameitonthebaking

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